PSAT Essay Practice Test

Welcome to your PSAT Essay Practice Test

Questions 1-9 are based on the following passage.


This passage is adapted from Jane Austen, Emma, originally


published in 1815.


Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich,


with a comfortable home and happy disposition,


seemed to unite some of the best blessings of


existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in


the world with very little to distress or vex her.


She was the youngest of the two daughters of a


most affectionate, indulgent father, and had, in


consequence of her sister’s marriage, been mistress of


his house from a very early period. Her mother had


died too long ago for her to have more than an


indistinct remembrance of her caresses, and her


place had been supplied by an excellent woman as


governess, who had fallen little short of a mother in


affection.


Sixteen years had Miss Taylor been in


Mr. Woodhouse’s family, less as a governess than a


friend, very fond of both daughters, but particularly


of Emma. Between them it was more the intimacy of


sisters. Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold


the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her


temper had hardly allowed her to impose any


restraint; and the shadow of authority being now


long passed away, they had been living together as


friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma


doing just what she liked; highly esteeming


Miss Taylor’s judgment, but directed chiefly by


her own.


The real evils indeed of Emma’s situation were the


power of having rather too much her own way, and a


disposition to think a little too well of herself; these


were the disadvantages which threatened alloy to her


many enjoyments. The danger, however, was at


present so unperceived, that they did not by any


means rank as misfortunes with her.


Sorrow came—a gentle sorrow—but not at


all in the shape of any disagreeable


consciousness.—Miss Taylor married. It was


Miss Taylor’s loss which first brought grief. It was on


the wedding-day of this beloved friend that Emma


first sat in mournful thought of any continuance.


The wedding over and the bride-people gone, her


father and herself were left to dine together, with no


prospect of a third to cheer a long evening. Her


father composed himself to sleep after dinner, as


usual, and she had then only to sit and think of what


she had lost.


The event had every promise of happiness for her


friend. Mr. Weston was a man of unexceptionable


character, easy fortune, suitable age and pleasant


manners; and there was some satisfaction in


considering with what self-denying, generous


friendship she had always wished and promoted the


match; but it was a black morning’s work for her.


The want of Miss Taylor would be felt every hour of


every day. She recalled her past kindness—the kindness, the affection of sixteen years—how she had


taught and how she had played with her from five


years old—how she had devoted all her powers to


attach and amuse her in health—and how nursed her


60 through the various illnesses of childhood. A large


debt of gratitude was owing here; but the intercourse


of the last seven years, the equal footing and perfect


unreserve which had soon followed Isabella’s


marriage on their being left to each other, was yet a


dearer, tenderer recollection. It had been a friend and


companion such as few possessed, intelligent,


well-informed, useful, gentle, knowing all the ways of


the family, interested in all its concerns, and


peculiarly interested in herself, in every pleasure,


every scheme of her’s;—one to whom she could


speak every thought as it arose, and who had such an


affection for her as could never find fault.


How was she to bear the change?—It was true that


her friend was going only half a mile from them; but


Emma was aware that great must be the difference


between a Mrs. Weston only half a mile from them,


and a Miss Taylor in the house; and with all her


advantages, natural and domestic, she was now in


great danger of suffering from intellectual solitude.


She dearly loved her father, but he was no


companion for her. He could not meet her in


conversation, rational or playful.


The evil of the actual disparity in their ages (and


Mr. Woodhouse had not married early) was much


increased by his constitution and habits; for having


been a valetudinarian* all his life, without activity of


mind or body, he was a much older man in ways


than in years; and though everywhere beloved for the


friendliness of his heart and his amiable temper, his


talents could not have recommended him at


any time.


* a person in weak health who is overly concerned with his or her


ailments

The main purpose of the passage is to
Which choice best summarizes the first two paragraphs of the passage
(lines 1-14)?
(A) Even though a character loses a parent at an early age, she is
happily raised in a loving home.
(B) An affectionate governess helps a character to overcome the loss of
her mother, despite the indifference of her father.
(C) Largely as a result of her father’s wealth and affection, a character
leads a contented life.
(D) A character has a generally comfortable and fulfilling life, but then
she must recover from losing her mother.
The narrator indicates that the particular nature of Emma’s upbringing
resulted in her being
(A) despondent.
(B) self-satisfied.
(C) friendless.
(D) inconsiderate.
Which choice provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous
question?
(A) Lines 1-5 (“Emma . . . her”)
(B) Lines 9-14 (“Her . . . affection”)
(C) Lines 28-32 (“The real . . . enjoyments”)
(D) Lines 32-34 (“The danger . . . her”)
As used in line 26, “directed” most nearly means
(A) trained.
(B) aimed.
(C) guided.
(D) addressed.
As used in line 54, “want” most nearly means
(A) desire.
(B) lack.
(C) requirement.
(D) request.
It can most reasonably be inferred that after Miss Taylor married, she had
(A) less patience with Mr. Woodhouse.
(B) fewer interactions with Emma.
(C) more close friends than Emma.
(D) an increased appreciation for Emma
Which choice provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous
question?
(A) Line 37 (“Miss . . . married”)
(B) Lines 47-48 (“The event . . . friend”)
(C) Lines 61-66 (“A large . . . recollection”)
(D) Lines 74-81 (“How . . . solitude”)
Which situation is most similar to the one described in lines 84-92 (“The
evil . . . time”)?
(A) A mother and her adult son have distinct tastes in art and music
that result in repeated family arguments.
(B) The differences between an older and a younger friend are
magnified because the younger one is more active and athletic.
(C) An older and a younger scientist remain close friends despite the
fact that the older one’s work is published more frequently.
(D) The age difference between a high school student and a college
student becomes a problem even though they enjoy the same diversions
As used in line 10, “plot” most nearly means
(A) mark.
(B) form.
(C) plan.
(D) claim
The references to the shoemaker, the programmer, and the apple farmer
in lines 37-40 (“We can easily . . . community”) primarily serve to
(A) illustrate the quality of products and services in countries around
the world.
(B) emphasize the broad reach of technologies used to connect people.
(C) demonstrate that recommendations made online are trustworthy.
(D) call attention to the limits of the expansion of the global economy.
The passage’s discussion of life in the Soviet Union in the 1960s and 1970s
primarily serves to
(A) introduce the concept of social networking.
(B) demonstrate that technology has improved social connections.
(C) list differences between the Soviet Union and other countries.
(D) emphasize the importance of examining historical trends.
As used in line 45, “post” most nearly means
(A) publish.
(B) transfer.
(C) assign.
(D) denounce.
The author indicates that, in comparison to individuals, traditional
organizations have tended to be
(A) more innovative and less influential.
(B) larger in size and less subject to regulations.
(C) less reliable and less interconnected.
(D) less efficient and more expensive.
Your new question!
Which choice provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous
question?
(A) Lines 22-26 (“Empowered . . . connectedness”)
(B) Lines 40-42 (“We no longer . . . ideas”)
(C) Lines 47-50 (“We are moving . . . socialstructing”)
(D) Lines 66-72 (“amplified . . . ease”)
The author recognizes counterarguments to the position she takes in the
passage by
(A) acknowledging the risks and drawbacks associated with new
technologies and social networks.
(B) admitting that some people spend too much time unproductively
on the Internet.
(C) drawing an analogy between conditions today and conditions in
the Soviet Union of the 1960s and 1970s.
(D) conceding that the drawbacks of socialstructing may prove over
time to outweigh the benefits.
Which choice provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous
question?
(A) Lines 35-37 (“We can look . . . videos”)
(B) Lines 74-76 (“a world . . . hackers”)
(C) Lines 79-84 (“They . . . science”)
(D) Lines 85-87(“Much . . . time”)
Which statement best summarizes the information presented in the
graph?
(A) Far more people around the world own computers and cell phones
today than in 2005.
(B) The number of people sharing digital information has more than
tripled since 2005.
(C) The volume of digital information created and shared has increased
tremendously in recent years.
(D) The amount of digital information created and shared is likely to be
almost 8 zettabytes in 2015.
According to the graph, which statement is true about the amount of
digital information projected to be created and shared globally in 2012?
(A) Growth in digital information creation and sharing was projected to
be wildly out of proportion to growth in 2011 and 2013E.
(B) The amount of digital information created and shared was projected to
begin a new upward trend.
(C) The amount of digital information created and shared was projected
to peak.
(D) The amount of digital information created and shared was projected
to pass 2 zettabytes for the first time.
The passage is written from the perspective of someone who is
A) actively involved in conducting hibernator research.
B) a participant in a recent debate in the field of cardiology.
C) knowledgeable about advances in hibernator research.
D) an advocate for wildlife preservation.
Questions 1-9 are based on the following passage.
This passage is adapted from Jane Austen, Emma, originally
published in 1815.
Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich,
with a comfortable home and happy disposition,
seemed to unite some of the best blessings of
existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in
the world with very little to distress or vex her.
She was the youngest of the two daughters of a
most affectionate, indulgent father, and had, in
consequence of her sister’s marriage, been mistress of
his house from a very early period. Her mother had
died too long ago for her to have more than an
indistinct remembrance of her caresses, and her
place had been supplied by an excellent woman as
governess, who had fallen little short of a mother in
affection.
Sixteen years had Miss Taylor been in
Mr. Woodhouse’s family, less as a governess than a
friend, very fond of both daughters, but particularly
of Emma. Between them it was more the intimacy of
sisters. Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold
the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her
temper had hardly allowed her to impose any
restraint; and the shadow of authority being now
long passed away, they had been living together as
friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma
doing just what she liked; highly esteeming
Miss Taylor’s judgment, but directed chiefly by
her own.
The real evils indeed of Emma’s situation were the
power of having rather too much her own way, and a
disposition to think a little too well of herself; these
were the disadvantages which threatened alloy to her
many enjoyments. The danger, however, was at
present so unperceived, that they did not by any
means rank as misfortunes with her.
Sorrow came—a gentle sorrow—but not at
all in the shape of any disagreeable
consciousness.—Miss Taylor married. It was
Miss Taylor’s loss which first brought grief. It was on
the wedding-day of this beloved friend that Emma
first sat in mournful thought of any continuance.
The wedding over and the bride-people gone, her
father and herself were left to dine together, with no
prospect of a third to cheer a long evening. Her
father composed himself to sleep after dinner, as
usual, and she had then only to sit and think of what
she had lost.
The event had every promise of happiness for her
friend. Mr. Weston was a man of unexceptionable
character, easy fortune, suitable age and pleasant
manners; and there was some satisfaction in
considering with what self-denying, generous
friendship she had always wished and promoted the
match; but it was a black morning’s work for her.
The want of Miss Taylor would be felt every hour of
every day. She recalled her past kindness—the
1 1 .......................................................................................................................................................................................................
Line
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
55
Unauthorized copying or reuse of any part of this page is illegal.
2
CONTINUE
kindness, the affection of sixteen years—how she had
taught and how she had played with her from five
years old—how she had devoted all her powers to
attach and amuse her in health—and how nursed her
60 through the various illnesses of childhood. A large
debt of gratitude was owing here; but the intercourse
of the last seven years, the equal footing and perfect
unreserve which had soon followed Isabella’s
marriage on their being left to each other, was yet a
dearer, tenderer recollection. It had been a friend and
companion such as few possessed, intelligent,
well-informed, useful, gentle, knowing all the ways of
the family, interested in all its concerns, and
peculiarly interested in herself, in every pleasure,
every scheme of her’s;—one to whom she could
speak every thought as it arose, and who had such an
affection for her as could never find fault.
How was she to bear the change?—It was true that
her friend was going only half a mile from them; but
Emma was aware that great must be the difference
between a Mrs. Weston only half a mile from them,
and a Miss Taylor in the house; and with all her
advantages, natural and domestic, she was now in
great danger of suffering from intellectual solitude.
She dearly loved her father, but he was no
companion for her. He could not meet her in
conversation, rational or playful.
The evil of the actual disparity in their ages (and
Mr. Woodhouse had not married early) was much
increased by his constitution and habits; for having
been a valetudinarian* all his life, without activity of
mind or body, he was a much older man in ways
than in years; and though everywhere beloved for the
friendliness of his heart and his amiable temper, his
talents could not have recommended him at
any time.
* a person in weak health who is overly concerned with his or her
ailments
Questions 1-9 are based on the following passage.<br />This passage is adapted from Jane Austen, Emma, originally<br />published in 1815.<br />Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich,<br />with a comfortable home and happy disposition,<br />seemed to unite some of the best blessings of<br />existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in<br />the world with very little to distress or vex her.<br />She was the youngest of the two daughters of a<br />most affectionate, indulgent father, and had, in<br />consequence of her sister’s marriage, been mistress of<br />his house from a very early period. Her mother had<br />died too long ago for her to have more than an<br />indistinct remembrance of her caresses, and her<br />place had been supplied by an excellent woman as<br />governess, who had fallen little short of a mother in<br />affection.<br />Sixteen years had Miss Taylor been in<br />Mr. Woodhouse’s family, less as a governess than a<br />friend, very fond of both daughters, but particularly<br />of Emma. Between them it was more the intimacy of<br />sisters. Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold<br />the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her<br />temper had hardly allowed her to impose any<br />restraint; and the shadow of authority being now<br />long passed away, they had been living together as<br />friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma<br />doing just what she liked; highly esteeming<br />Miss Taylor’s judgment, but directed chiefly by<br />her own.<br />The real evils indeed of Emma’s situation were the<br />power of having rather too much her own way, and a<br />disposition to think a little too well of herself; these<br />were the disadvantages which threatened alloy to her<br />many enjoyments. The danger, however, was at<br />present so unperceived, that they did not by any<br />means rank as misfortunes with her.<br />Sorrow came—a gentle sorrow—but not at<br />all in the shape of any disagreeable<br />consciousness.—Miss Taylor married. It was<br />Miss Taylor’s loss which first brought grief. It was on<br />the wedding-day of this beloved friend that Emma<br />first sat in mournful thought of any continuance.<br />The wedding over and the bride-people gone, her<br />father and herself were left to dine together, with no<br />prospect of a third to cheer a long evening. Her<br />father composed himself to sleep after dinner, as<br />usual, and she had then only to sit and think of what<br />she had lost.<br />The event had every promise of happiness for her<br />friend. Mr. Weston was a man of unexceptionable<br />character, easy fortune, suitable age and pleasant<br />manners; and there was some satisfaction in<br />considering with what self-denying, generous<br />friendship she had always wished and promoted the<br />match; but it was a black morning’s work for her.<br />The want of Miss Taylor would be felt every hour of<br />every day. She recalled her past kindness—the<br />1 1 .......................................................................................................................................................................................................<br />Line<br />5<br />10<br />15<br />20<br />25<br />30<br />35<br />40<br />45<br />50<br />55<br />Unauthorized copying or reuse of any part of this page is illegal.<br />2<br />CONTINUE<br />kindness, the affection of sixteen years—how she had<br />taught and how she had played with her from five<br />years old—how she had devoted all her powers to<br />attach and amuse her in health—and how nursed her<br />60 through the various illnesses of childhood. A large<br />debt of gratitude was owing here; but the intercourse<br />of the last seven years, the equal footing and perfect<br />unreserve which had soon followed Isabella’s<br />marriage on their being left to each other, was yet a<br />dearer, tenderer recollection. It had been a friend and<br />companion such as few possessed, intelligent,<br />well-informed, useful, gentle, knowing all the ways of<br />the family, interested in all its concerns, and<br />peculiarly interested in herself, in every pleasure,<br />every scheme of her’s;—one to whom she could<br />speak every thought as it arose, and who had such an<br />affection for her as could never find fault.<br />How was she to bear the change?—It was true that<br />her friend was going only half a mile from them; but<br />Emma was aware that great must be the difference<br />between a Mrs. Weston only half a mile from them,<br />and a Miss Taylor in the house; and with all her<br />advantages, natural and domestic, she was now in<br />great danger of suffering from intellectual solitude.<br />She dearly loved her father, but he was no<br />companion for her. He could not meet her in<br />conversation, rational or playful.<br />The evil of the actual disparity in their ages (and<br />Mr. Woodhouse had not married early) was much<br />increased by his constitution and habits; for having<br />been a valetudinarian* all his life, without activity of<br />mind or body, he was a much older man in ways<br />than in years; and though everywhere beloved for the<br />friendliness of his heart and his amiable temper, his<br />talents could not have recommended him at<br />any time.<br />* a person in weak health who is overly concerned with his or her<br />ailments

Author: Scholarshipsgist

A Blogger, Web Developer, Educationalist, And I Love To Share Helpful Information.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.